Panels

Panel 1

Shakespeare in Brazilian Popular Culture
 

Leader

Aimara da Cunha Resende, Centro de Estudos Shakespeareanos (Brazil)
 

Participants

  1. Livia Segurado Nunes, Aix-Marseille Université – LERMA (France)
    Shakespeare à la Brasileira: A comical and folkloric Richard III
  2. Aimara da Cunha Resende, Centro de Estudos Shakespeareanos (Brazil)
    Shakespeare on the Brazilian Screens

 

Schedule

Thursday 24 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: V106B.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 2

Shakespeare and Science
 

Leaders

Sophie Chiari (chiarisophie@hotmail.com) is a Senior Lecturer in English Literature at Aix-Marseille University, France. She has written several articles on Elizabethan drama and poetry, and has recently published a monograph on The Image of the Labyrinth in the Renaissance (Champion, 2010). She has just completed a translation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice into French (Le livre de poche, 2011) and a revised edition of Renaissance Tales of Desire (CSP, 2012). She is currently working on a special issue of EREA devoted to colours in early modern England as well as on a book devoted to William Shakespeare and Robert Greene (Classiques Garnier). She is also part of a collaborative project coordinated by Jean-Michel Déprats and focused on the translation of Tennessee Williams’s dramatic works (Editions théâtrales).
Mickael Popelard (mickael.popelard@unicaen.fr) is a Senior Lecturer in English studies at the University of Caen-Basse Normandie, France. His interests include Renaissance literature as well as the history of ideas. He has written several articles on Elizabethan drama and early modern men of science such as John Dee or Thomas Harriot. His latest publications include a book on Francis Bacon (Francis Bacon: l’humaniste, le magicien, l’ingénieur, Paris, PUF, 2010) and a monograph on the figure of the scientist in Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus (Rêves de puissance et ruine de l’âme: la figure du savant chez Shakespeare et Marlowe, Paris, PUF, 2010). He has also recently contributed to a volume on the quest for the Northwest Passage edited by Frédéric Regard (The Quest for the Northwest Passage, London, Pickering and Chatto, 2013).
 

Participants

Panel A: Shakespeare et la science

  1. Frank Lestringant, Paris Sorbonne (France)
    La Tempête de Shakespeare, ou le témoignage de la cartographie renaissante
  2. Margaret Jones-Davies, Université Paris Sorbonne (France)
    Les énigmes abstraites (‘abstract riddles’) de l’alchimie (Ben Jonson, The Alchemist, 2.1.104)
  3. Pierre Iselin, Université Paris Sorbonne (France)
    La musique : science ou pratique ?
  4. Pascal Brioist, Université de Tours (France)
    L’école de la nuit revue et corrigée

Panel B: Shakespeare and Science

  1. Carla Mazzio, University at Buffalo, SUNY (USA)
    The Drama of Mathematics in the Age of Shakespeare
  2. Jonathan Pollock, University of Perpignan (France)
    Shakespeare and Atomism
  3. Anne-Valérie Dulac, University of Paris 13 Nord (France)
    Shakespeare’s Alhazen: Love’s Labour’s Lost and the history of optics
  4. Liliane Campos, University of Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle (France)
    Wheels have been set in motion”: geocentrism and relativity in Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

 

Schedule

Panel A: Friday 25 April 2014, 9h-10h30

Panel B: Friday 25 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: Vendôme.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 3

Shakespeare Jubilees on three Continents
 

Leader

Christa Jansohn, University of Bamberg (Germany) and Dieter Mehl, University of Bonn (Germany)
 

Participants

  1. Andrew Dickson, Theatre Editor for the Guardian (UK)
    National Poet or National Disgrace? Britain’s Tercentenary of 1864
  2. Marie-Clémence Régnier, Université Paris Sorbonne (France)
    «Que peut donc le bronze là où est la gloire?» The French Jubilee in 1864: monuments and pilgrimage in Stratford in Victor Hugo’s William Shakespeare
  3. Júlia Paraizs, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary)
    Festive and Critical Approaches: Shakespeare’s Tercentenary (1864) in Hungary
  4. Ann Jennalie Cook, Vanderbilt University (USA)
    Commemorations Behind the Scenes
  5. Alfredo Michel Modenessi, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)
    Latin America, 1964: Art and Politics in the Year of Celebrating Shakespeare
  6. Mami Adachi, University of the Sacred Heart, Tokyo (Japan)
    Commemorating Shakespeare in Japan

 

Schedule

Panel A: Tuesday 22 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Panel B: Tuesday 22 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: ENS, salle Dussane.

 

More information

In this panel we propose to discuss the different ways in which geographically distant countries – with their distinct cultural traditions and political histories – have celebrated Shakespeare. This has not until now been the object of a comparative study; and we hope that ours will throw some new light on his contribution to global cultural life.

For abstracts, click here.

 
 

Panel 4

Secular Shakespeares
 

Leader

Edward Simon (USA)
 

Participants

  1. Andrea F. Trocha-Van Nort, United States Air Force Academy (USA)
    Shakespeare’s Secular Man within Nature
  2. Camilla Caporicci, University of Perugia (Italy)
    “I Guess One Angel in Another’s Hell”: The “Heretical” Nature of the Dark Lady Sonnets and Their Reception
  3. Jean-Louis Claret, Aix-Marseille University (France)
    Shakespeare the Atheist
  4. Cristiano Ragni, University of Perugia (Italy)
    «Necessity will make us all forsworn»: French brawls and Machiavellian kings in Shakespeare’s plays

 

Schedule

Friday 25 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Room: V106B.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 5

Born before and after Shakespeare
 

Leaders

Anne-Valérie Dulac, Université Paris 13 Nord (France) and Laetitia Sansonetti, École polytechnique and EA PRISMES – Université Paris 3 (France)
 

Participants

Panel A: Tradition and the Shakespearean talent (chair: Laetitia Sansonetti)

  1. Andy Auckbur, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (France)
    “He was another Nature”: Shakespeare’s genius and sixteenth-century literary theory
  2. Daniel Cadman, Sheffield Hallam University (United Kingdom)
    ‘Quick Comedians’: Garnier, Sidney, and Antony and Cleopatra
  3. Sally Barnden, King’s College, London (United Kingdom)
    The man with the skull: negotiating Hamlet’s appropriation of memento mori art

Panel B: Shakespeare and his foils (chair: Anne-Valérie Dulac)

  1. Chantal Schütz, École polytechnique and EA PRISMES – Université Paris 3 (France)
    Middleton and Shakespeare: collaboration, parody and rewriting
  2. Rémi Vuillemin, Université de Strasbourg (France)
    ‘The course of true love never did run smooth’: Renaissance Petrarchism and Shakespearean criticism
  3. Laetitia Sansonetti, École polytechnique and EA PRISMES – Université Paris 3 (France)
    Shakespeare = Marlowe + Spenser? The coincidence of opposites as critical dogma

 

Schedule

Panel A: Saturday 26 April 2014, 9h-10h30

Panel B: Saturday 26 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: Vendôme.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 7

Telling Tales of / from Shakespeare: Indian Ishtyle
 

Leaders

Dr. Poonam Trivedi, Associate Professor, Department of English, Indraprastha College, University of Delhi, Delhi (India) poonamtrivedi2@gmail.com

Dr. Sarbani Chaudhury, Professor, Department of English, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, India sarbanich@gmail.com

 

Participants

  1. Sarbani Chaudhury, University of Kalyani (India)
    Fun, Frolic and Shakespeare: Kalyani Ishtyle
  2. Poonam Trivedi, University of Delhi (India)
    Rhapsode of Shakespeare: V Sambasivan’s popular kathaprasangam / storytelling
  3. Paromita Chakravarti, Jadavpur University, Kolkata (India)
    Taming of the Bard, Bengali ishtyle: Domesticating farce in Srimati Bhayankari
  4. Preti Taneja, Royal Holloway, University of London (UK)
    Who is the wise man and who is the Fool? The importance of buffoonery in Indian Shakespeare

 

Schedule

Tuesday 22 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Room: V106B.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 8

Shakespeare and ‘th’intertrafique’ of French and English Texts and Manners
 

Leaders

Dympna Callaghan, M. Tudeau-Clayton, Lukas Erne, Indira Ghose (USA-Switzerland)
 

Participants

  1. Lukas Erne, University of Geneva (Switzerland)
    Reconfiguring Shakespeare: Catholic and Protestant Editing
  2. Margaret Tudeau-Clayton, University of Neuchâtel (Switzerland)
    “All of one communitie”: Shakespeare, Florio and the translation of Montaigne
  3. Indira Ghose, University of Fribourg (Switzerland)
    Shakespeare, Civility, and Identity in Early Modern England
  4. Dympna Callaghan, Syracuse University (USA)
    Shakespeare and the Culture of Resemblance

 

Schedule

Thursday 24 April 2014, 9h-10h30

Room: L109.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 9

Bakhtinian Forays into Shakespeare: Word, Gestures, Space
 

Leaders

Carla Dente, Martin Procházka, Pavel Drábek (Italy-Czech Rep.-UK)
 

Participants

  1. Carla Dente, University of Pisa (Italy)
    Heteroglossia and Text Construction in the Framework of Political and Cultural Diversity: From Shakespeare’s Henry V to Greig’s Dunsinane
  2. Pavel Drábek, University of Hull (United Kingdom)
    Heteroglossic Subjects: the Dialogism of the Shakespearean Actor
  3. Martin Procházka, Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic)
    Chronotope and Heterotopia: Carnival Time and Grotesque Bodies in Twelfth Night and The Second Part of Henry IV

 

Schedule

Friday 25 April 2014, 9h-10h30

Room: V106A.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 10

Shakespeare and Natural History
 

Leader

Christopher Leslie, Polytechnic School of Engineering at New York University (USA)
 

Participants

Panel A

Panel A

  1. Justin Kolb, American University in Cairo (Egypt)
    “The Dissolution of the Engine of this World”: The decay of nature and the Anthropocene in the history plays
  2. Felix Sprang, University of Hamburg (Germany)
    “What manner o’ thing is your crocodile?” Shakespeare’s Animals – a Class of Their Own.
  3. Martin Hyatt, Ph.D., independent scholar
    Shakespeare and Birds
  4. Jarosław Włodarczyk, Polish Academy of Sciences and Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin
    and Zuzanna Czerniak, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin (Poland)
    Astronomical Fragments in Shakespeare and Modern History of Astronomy

Panel B

  1. Christopher Leslie, Polytechnic School of Engineering at New York University (USA)
    Specters of Unnatural History in Macbeth
  2. Marianne Kimura, Yamaguchi Prefectural College (Japan)
    Hamlet as a Cosmic Allegory about Solar Energy
  3. Shu-hua Chung, Tung Fang Design Institute (Taiwan)
    Nature in The Tempest
  4. Neslihan Ekmekçioğlu, Hacettepe University and Bilkent University (Turkey)
    The Tempest in Prospero’s Mind and in Outer Space, Reflecting the Creative Imagination of the Artist and the Natural History of the Time

 

Schedule

Panel A: Saturday 26 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Panel B: Saturday 26 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: V115/V116.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 11

’The Undiscovered Country – the Future’ – Shakespeare in Science Fiction
 

Leader

Simone Broders, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)
 

Participants

  1. Simone Broders, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany)
    “TaH pagh, taHbe'” – Shakespearean Heritage in the Postmodern Space Opera
  2. Delilah Bermudez Brataas, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim (Norway)
    The Extraordinary Presence of Shakespeare and his Characters in Alan Moore’s League of Extraordinary Gentlemen
  3. Sujata Iyengar, University of Georgia (USA)
    ‘Desdemona’s Voice’: The Shakespearean Past in Jeff Noon’s Vurt
  4. Jennifer Drouin, University of Alabama (USA)
    Doctor Who‘s “The Shakespeare Code”, or Science Fiction as a new New Historicism

 

Schedule

Wednesday 23 April 2014, 16h-17h30.

Room: Vendôme.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 12

Crossroads: 21st century perspectives on Shakespeare’s Classical Mythology
 

Leaders

Agnès Lafont, University of Montpellier – Institut d’Etudes sur la Renaissance, L’âge Classique et les Lumières, UMR 5186 (France)
and Atsuhiko Hirota, Kyoto University (Japan)
 

Participants

Chair : Yves Peyré, Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier (France)

  1. Charlotte Coffin, Université Paris Est Créteil Val de Marne (France)
    Where from and where to? Heywood’s appropriation of classical mythology in The Golden Age (1611)
  2. Tania Demetriou, University of York (UK)
    The Genre of Myth, or Myth without Ovid?
  3. Atsuhiko Hirota, University of Kyoto (Japan)
    Venetian Enchantresses and Egyptian Sorcery: Transformations of the Circean Myth in Othello
  4. Agnès Lafont, Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier (France)
    Ovidian emergences in Spenser’s Faery Queen: Britomart and Myrrha, an unexpected textual junction?
  5. Janice Valls-Russell, Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier (France)
    Constance and Arthur as Andromache and Astyanax? Trojan Shadows in Shakespeare’s King John

 

Schedule

Friday 25 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: L106.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 13

Popular Shakespeares in East Asia: Local and Global Dissemination
 

Leaders

Yilin Chen (Providence University, Taiwan) and Ryuta Minami (Shirayuri College, Japan)
 

Participants


Session A: Theoretical Perspectives on Manga and Animation Shakespeares

Chair: Ryuta Minami (Shirayuri College, Japan)

  1. Yilin Chen, Providence University (Taiwan)
    Frailty, Thy Name Is Woman”: A Striking Absence of Gertrude and Her Sexuality in the Taiwanese Graphic Novels of Hamlet
  2. Ma Yujin, University of London (UK)
    A Brief Study of the Readership of Chinese Shakespeare Manga
  3. Ryuta Minami, Shirayuri College (Japan)
    Global Dissemination of Fragments of Shakespeare in Japanese Anime (Animation Films)

Session B: Practitioners’ Perspectives on Shakespeares and Manga

Chair: Yilin Chen, Providence University (Taiwan)

  1. Yukari Yoshihara, University of Tsukuba (Japan)
    Which is more global, manga or Shakespeare?
  2. Harumo Sanazaki,(Manga Artist (Japan) (with Ryuta Minami as an interpreter)
    Creating Manga Shakespeare for Mature female Readers: a Sex-Positive Feminist’s Point of View
  3. Emma Hayley, Managing Director of SelfMadeHero (UK)
    On SelfMadeHero’s Manga Shakespeare Series
  4. Sonia Leon, Manga Artist (UK), creator of  Manga Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet

 

Schedule

Panel A: Wednesday 23 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Panel B: Thursday 24 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Room: Vendôme.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 14

Shakespeare and Levinas: Dialogue between a Playwright and a Philosopher
 

Leaders

Sean Lawrence and James Knapp (Canada-USA)
 

Participants

Panel A: Shakespearean Levinas

  1. Bruce Young, Brigham Young University (USA)
    Maternity, Substitution, and Transcendence: The Feminine in Shakespeare and Levinas
  2. Kent R. Lehnhof, Chapman University (USA)
    Disincarnating God: Theology and Phenomenology in King Lear
  3. Sean Lawrence, University of British Columbia (Canada)
    The Peace of Empires and the Empire of Peace in Shakespeare and Levinas

Panel B: Levinasian Shakespeare

  1. David Goldstein, York University (Canada)
    Blindness and Welcome in King Lear
  2. James Kearney, University of California, Santa Barbara (USA)
    Money, Sociality, Justice: The Levinasian Third and The Merchant of Venice
  3. James Knapp, Loyola University Chicago (USA)
    Time and the Other in Shakespeare’s Cymbeline

 

Schedule

Panel A: Thursday 24 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Panel B: Friday 25 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: V106A.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 15

Celebrating Shakespeare: Commemoration and Cultural Memory
 

Leaders

Clara Calvo, Universidad de Murcia (Spain) and Coppélia Kahn, Brown University (USA)
 

Participants

Panel A:

  1. Andrew Murphy, University of St. Andrews (UK)
    Radical Commemorations: 1864 Chartists and 1916 Rebels
  2. Monika Smialkowska, Northumbria University (UK)
    Reluctant Commemorators: Rudyard Kipling’s and Thomas Hardy’s Contributions to Israel Gollanz’s A Book of Homage to Shakespeare
  3. Nely Keinänen, University of Helsinki (Finland)
    Commemoration as Nation-Building: The Case of Finland, 1916

Panel B:

  1. Richard Schoch, Queen’s University Belfast (Ireland)
    Genealogies of Shakespearean Acting
  2. Graham Holderness, University of Hertfordshire (UK)
    Remembrance of Things Past: 1851, 1951, 2012
  3. Nicola J. Watson, Open University (UK)
    Gardening with Shakespeare

 

Schedule

Panel A: Wednesday 23 April 2014, 9h-10h30

Panel B: Wednesday 23 April 2014, 16h-17h30.

Room: V107.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 16

Shakespeare and Architecture
 

Leader

Roy Eriksen (Norway)
 

Participants

  1. Michael Alijewicz, Queen’s University Belfast (Ireland)
    Birnam Wood Moves on the Stage: Reading Probability and Architecture in Macbeth
  2. Lois Leveen (USA)
    Putting the ‘Where’ into ‘Wherefore Art Thou’: Urban Architectures of Desire in Romeo and Juliet
  3. Muriel Cunin, Université de Limoges (France)
    Shakespeare, Architecture and Privacy
  4. Melissa Auclair, University of Toronto (Canada)
    Coming into the Closet: Spatial Practices and Imagined Space in Shakespeare’s Plays

 

Schedule

Thursday 24 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: L109.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 17

Shakespeare and the Popular Culture within/Beyond the Asian Identities
 

Leader

Kang Kim, Honam University (S-Korea)
 

Participants

Panel A:

  1. Renfang Tang, University of Hull (UK)
    From Shakespeare’s Text to Chinese Stage: Performance-oriented Translation of Measure for Measure
  2. Pawit Mahasarinand, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand)
    Shakespeare in Contemporary Thailand: Macbeth in Thai Politics and Othello in Thai Premier League
  3. Thea Buckley, University of Birmingham (UK)
    Appropriating Shakespeare in South Asia: Cases of the Malayalam Films

Panel B:

  1. Yukari Yoshihara, University of Tsukuba (Japan)
    Transvestites in Shakespeare and Manga Adaptations of Shakespeare
  2. Kang Kim, Honam University (S-Korea)
    Graphic Shakespeare in Korea: From Literature to Pop Culture
  3. Lipika Das, IIIT Unitary University-Odisha (India)
    The Effects of Western impact on Odia literature through Shakespeare Translations

 

Schedule

Tuesday 22 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: V106B.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 18

«As you like it!», la psychanalyse à la rencontre de Shakespeare
 

Leader

Marthe Dubreuil (France)
 

Participants

  1. Philippe Adrien, stage director (France)
  2. Marielle David, Pédopsychiatre psychanalyste (France)
    Roméo et Othello, «Objet ou sujet de la passion?»
  3. Marthe Dubreuil, actress and stage director, Psychologue clinicienne psychanalyste (France)
    Shakespeare, aux limites du genre
  4. Thémis Golégou, Université Paris 7 (France)
    Ophélie, «le signe éternel» de la fin
  5. Christian Hoffmann, Université Paris 7 (France)
    Le désir d’Hamlet
  6. Alain Vanier, Université Paris 7 (France)

 

Schedule

Thursday 24 April 2014, 11h-12h30

Room: Vendôme.

 

More information

Le panel propose une approche psychanalytique de certains des héros shakespeariens, à partir des concepts fondamentaux de la psychanalyse, de Freud à Lacan: Le complexe œdipien, deuil et mélancolie, désir et relation d’objet, fonction paternelle. Le metteur en scène Philippe Adrien complètera cette axprocleen racontant comment sa connaissance de la psychanalyse a pu, ou non, modifier son regard dans ses mises en scène de Shakespeare.
 
 

Panel 19

‘This Earth’
 

Leader

Ruth Morse (France)
 

Participants

Chair: Indira Ghose, Université de Fribourg (Switzerland)

  1. Ruth Morse, Université Paris-Diderot (France)
    Earths
  2. Russ McDonald, Goldsmiths College, University of London (UK)
    Come Into the Garden, Bard
  3. David Schalkwyk, director of Global Shakespeare, Queen Mary University of London / University of Warwick (UK)
    Land and Freedom

 

Schedule

Friday 25 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: V106B.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 20

Moving Shakespeare: Approaches in Choreographing Shakespeare
 

Leader

Marisa C. Hayes, Festival International de Vidéo Danse de Bourgogne (France/USA)
 

Participants

  1. Sidia Fiorato, University of Verona (Italy)
    From Verbal to Visual Aesthetics: Remediating Shakespeare Through the Dancing Body
  2. Lorelle Browning, Pacific University (USA)
    Adapting Shakespeare’s Rhythmic Structure to Movement
  3. Freya Vass-Rhee, PhD, University of Kent (UK)
    Hamlet and the Creation of William Forsythe’s Sider

 

Schedule

Tuesday 22 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Room: V115/V116.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 21

Diplomacy, International Relations and The Bard in the Pre- and Post-Westphalian Worlds
 

Leader

Nathalie Rivere de Carles (France)
 

Participants

  1. Timothy Hampton, University of California at Berkeley (USA)
    Delay, Deferral, and Interpretation in Renaissance Peacemaking
  2. Joanna Craigwood, Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge (UK)
    Diplomacy and King John
  3. Nathalie Rivere de Carles, Université Toulouse Le Mirail (France)
    Mutual disarmament and the politics of appeasement in Shakespearean drama

 

Schedule

Thursday 24 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Room: TBA.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 22

Shakespeare and Marlowe
 

Leader

Lisa Hopkins, Sheffield Hallam University (UK)
 

Participants

  1. Chloe Preedy, University of Exeter (UK)
    Fortune’s Breath: Rewriting the Classical Storm in Marlowe and Shakespeare
  2. Paul Frazer, Northumbria University (UK)
    Marlowe and Shakespeare Restaged: Influence, Appropriation, and ‘Mobility’ in Thomas Dekker’s Drama
  3. Roy Eriksen, University of Agder (Norway)
    Working with Marlowe: Shakespeare’s Early Engagement with Marlowe’s Poetics

 

Schedule

Friday 25 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Room: L106.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 23

Shakespeare, Satire and ‘Inn Jokes’
 

Leader

Jackie Watson, Birbeck College, London (UK)
 

Participants

  1. Simon Smith, Birkbeck College, London (UK)
    Robert Armin on Shakespeare: The Two Maids of More-Clacke
  2. Derek Dunne, Queen’s University, Belfast (UK)
    Serious Joking with Shakespeare’s Hamlet
  3. Jackie Watson, Birkbeck College, London (UK)
    Satirical expectations: Shakespeare’s Inns of Court audiences

 

Schedule

Saturday 26 April 2014, 9h-10h30

Room: V106A.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 24

Shakespeare’s World in 1916
 

Leader

Gordon McMullan, King’s College London (UK)
 

Participants

  1. Ailsa Grant Ferguson, King’s College London (UK)
    “Under strange conditions”: Shakespeare at the Front
  2. Clara Calvo, University of Murcia (Spain)
    Shakespeare and the Red Cross: The 1916 Grafton Galleries Exhibition
  3. Gordon McMullan, King’s College London (UK)
    Goblin’s Market: Commemoration, Anti-Semitism and the Invention of “Global” Shakespeare in 1916
  4. Philip Mead, University of Western Australia (Australia)
    Antipodal Shakespeare

 

Schedule

Tuesday 22 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Room: V106A.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 25

Shakespeare et les romans hispano-américains
 

Leader

Cécile Brochard, Université de Nantes (France)
 

Participants

  1. Isabelle Colrat, Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle (France)
    Mémoire et pouvoir chez Carlos Fuentes : l’héritage shakespearien
  2. Lydie Royer, Université de Reims Champagne Ardenne, URCA (France)
    Les mises en scènes dans Palais Distants d’Abilio Estévez, roman cubain du
    XXIe siècle
  3. Cécile Brochard, Université de Nantes (France)
    Shakespeare et les romans hispano-américains du pouvoir

 

Schedule

Saturday 26 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: V106B.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 26

Shakespeare in French Theory
 

Leader

Richard Wilson, Kingston University (UK)
 

Participants

  1. Howard Caygill, Professor of Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University (UK), author of Levinas and the Political (London: Routledge, 2002).
  2. Ken McMullen, Anniversary Professor of Film Studies at Kingston University (UK), director of Ghost Dance, the 1983 film focusing on Jacques Derrida.
  3. Martin McQuillan, Professor of Literary Theory and Cultural Analysis and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Kingston University (UK), author of The Politics of Deconstruction: Jacques Derrida and the Other of Philosophy (London: Pluto Press, 2007).
  4. Richard Wilson, Sir Peter Hall Professor of Shakespeare Studies at Kingston University (UK), author of Shakespeare in French Theory: King of Shadows (London: Routledge, 2007).
  5. Simon Morgan Worthan, Professor of Humanities at Kingston University (UK), co-Director of the London Graduate School, author of The Poetics of Sleep: from Aristotle to Nancy (London: Bloomsbury, 2014).

 

Schedule

Thursday 24 April 2014, 9h-10h30.

Room: V106A.

 

More information

For description, click here.
 
 

Panel 27

Speaking ‘but in the figures and comparisons of it’? Figurative speech made literal in Shakespeare’s drama / page and stage
 

Leaders

Denis Lagae-Devoldère and Anne-Marie Miller-Blaise (France)
 

Participants

Chair and respondent: Denis Lagae-Devoldère, Université Paris-Sorbonne / Paris 4 (France)

  1. Rocco Coronato, University of Padua (Italy)
    Wafer-Cakes and Serpents: Melting the Symbol in Antony and Cleopatra
  2. John Gillies, University of Essex (UK)
    Calvinism as Tragedy in Othello
  3. Harry Newman, University of Kent (UK)
    ‘I spake but by a metaphor’ : The Material Culture of Metaphors in Shakespearean Drama
  4. Anne-Marie Miller-Blaise, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle / Paris 3 (France)
    Literal Vienna

 

Schedule

Tuesday 22 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: V115/V116.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 28

Shakespearean festivals and anniversaries in Cold War Europe 1947-1988
 

Leaders

Erica Sheen and Isabel Karremann (UK-Germany)
 

Participants

Respondents:

  1. Adam Piette, University of Sheffield (UK)
  2. Geoff Cubitt, University of York (UK)

Panelists:

  1. Erica Sheen, University of York (UK)
    ‘Zu politisch’:  Berlin and the Elizabethan Festival, 1948
  2. Nicole Fayard, University of Leicester (UK)
    Shakespeare’s Theatre of War in 1960s France
  3. Keith Gregory, University of Murcia (Spain)
    Coming out of the cold: the celebration of Shakespeare in Francoist Spain
  4. Isabel Karremann, University of Würzburg (Germany)
    Shakespeare in Cold War Germany: The Split of the German Shakespeare Society in 1964
  5. Krystyna Kujawinska Courtney, University of Łódź (Poland)
    A Story of One Publication: Commemorating the Fourth Centenary of Shakespeare’s Birth in Poland
  6. Irene R. Makaryk, University of Ottawa (Canada)
    1964: Shakespeare in the USSR
  7. Veronika Schandl, Pázmány Péter Catholic University (Hungary)
    ‘Memory holds a seat in this distracted globe’: Shakespeare productions in Hungary in 1976

 

Schedule

Panel A: Tuesday 22 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Panel B: Wednesday 23 April 2014, 9h-10h30

Room: V106A.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 29

The ends and means of knowing in Shakespeare and his world
 

Leader

Subha Mukherji, University of Cambridge (UK)
 

Participants

  1. Lorna Hutson, University of St. Andrews (UK)
    Imaginary Work: Lucrece’s Circumstances
  2. Joe Moshenska, University of Cambridge (UK)
    King Lear, Awkwardness, and Intention: Tolstoy’s Diatribe Reconsidered
  3. Subha Mukherji, University of Cambridge (UK)
    ‘O she’s warm’: sense, assent and affective cognition in the early modern numinous

 

Schedule

Saturday 26 April 2014, 11h-12h30.

Room: V106A.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 30

Shakespeare et le roman
 

Leader

Marie Dollé, CERR/CERCLL, Université de Picardie Jules Verne (France)
 

Participants

  1. Camille Guyon-Lecoq, Université de Picardie Jules Verne (France)
    Mourir sur le théâtre, de Quinault à Voltaire : motif «romanesque» ou trace d’un modèle shakespearien inavoué ?
  2. Audrey Faulot, Université de Picardie Jules Verne (France)
    Cleveland au miroir d’Hamlet : le spectre et l’identité, de la scène tragique à la narration romanesque
  3. Isabelle Hautbout, Université de Picardie Jules Verne (France)
    Shakespeare dans les épigraphes du roman français au début du XIXe siècle
  4. Marie Dollé, Université de Picardie Jules Verne (France)
    Segalen et Shakespeare : le secret d’Hamlet

 

Schedule

Saturday 26 April 2014, 9h-11h30.

Room: V106B.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.
 
 

Panel 31

Translations of Hamlet in Minority Cultures/Minor Languages
 

Leader

Márta Minier, University of South Wales (UK)
 

Participants

  1. Martin S. Regal, University of Iceland (Iceland)
    Hamlet in Icelandic
  2. Lily Kahn, University College London (UK)
    Domesticating Techniques in the First Hebrew Translation of Hamlet
  3. Roger Owen, Aberystwyth University (UK)
    On the Welsh Translations of Hamlet
  4. Nely Keinänen, University of Helsinki (Finland)
    Language-building and nation-building: the reception of Paavo Cajander’s translation of Hamlet, 1879

 

Schedule

Wednesday 23 April 2014, 16h-17h30.

Room: V106A.

 

More information

For abstracts, click here.